11/8/16 OpenEd

okay so first of all, I had to cancel my second standard. second, OpenEd is really one of the most boring things i’ve ever done, but I have to finish it because i really have no idea how i one got 3 out of 7 questions right. LOL. I have to either take a star test, or do pre-research, pre-research it is. LOL. I really am having a hard time finding research for these standards, like i really dont know how im supposed to find research for my standards. Do i just look up the standards, or should i read a book so i know how to do it? Okay, so I just searched my standards and i found 2 sources:

Start With Concrete Details-Before they can identify and work with the theme of a story, your students need to have a strong grasp of the details: setting, character, plot. When they work with theme, they have to synthesize all that information into an overarching message. Use chart paper to outline the elements of the story or give students a graphic organizer to follow.

Teaching Theme Vs. Main Idea-Many students have difficulty differentiating between the main idea and the theme. The theme is the underlying message that the author wants to convey, whereas the main idea is what the story is mostly about. Teach these concepts separately and together. You might practice identifying themes and main ideas using Disney films or the stories your students read last year in order to have a common reference point. After you review it as a class, give students a list of themes and main ideas and challenge them to work in pairs to create matches.

Ask Story-Specific Questions Too-Specific, targeted questions help focus students on the text. “Asking ‘what is the theme?’ sometimes strands students because it’s too general,” says Claff. On the other hand, questions that are more explicit, like “Where does friendship play an important part in this story?” can be too leading. Instead, ask questions that draw from the text and require evidence to support theme. For example, in Tuck Everlasting, “Should Winnie drink the immortality water?”

Connect Your Discussions to Other Subject Areas-Do you see examples in social studies or current events that connect to your theme? Start a collection or bulletin board around your current literature theme. Students can add examples from pop culture, history or other reading. Help students connect the theme to their own lives by assigning take-home activities that build personal experiences around each theme. When students study kindness in Great Books, they perform a random act of kindness. And when third-graders study gratitude, they give an anonymous gift so they can experience what it’s like to not receive a thank you.

http://www.weareteachers.com/11-tips-for-teaching-about-theme-in-language-arts/

Think about how the author conveys his ideas.

  • Consider:
  • o Direct statements.
  • o Imagery and symbolism.
  • o A character’s thoughts or statements.
  • o A character who stands for something (e.g. an archetype*)
  • o Overall impression/tone/moral of the work

Discovering minor themes

  • Are there recurring images, concepts, structures OR two contrasting ones?
  • Motifs often support minor themes.
  • How can allusions make a difference?
  • An allusion is a figure of speech wherein a phrase which is culturally recognizable is used as a type of shorthand for something else.

http://www.teachingcollegeenglish.com/2007/08/10/how-to-write-an-analysis-of-theme/

I know that isn’t enough, but I’m pretty happy i found something for my research. i;m going to keep looking for now, but ill probably take that stupid star test for the next 2 classes.

Discovering minor themes

  • Are there recurring images, concepts, structures OR two contrasting ones?
  • Motifs often support minor themes.
  • How can allusions make a difference?
  • An allusion is a figure of speech wherein a phrase which is culturally recognizable is used as a type of shorthand for something else.

Example #1

Love and friendship are frequently occurring themes in literature. They generate emotional twists and turns in a narrative and can lead to a variety of endings: happy, sad or bittersweet.

Example #2

The theme of war has been explored in literature since ancient times. The literary woks utilizing this theme may either glorify or criticize the idea of war. Most recent literary works portray war as a curse for humanity due to the suffering it inflicts.

Example #3

Crime and mystery are utilized in detective novels. Such narratives also include sub-themes such as “crimes cannot be hidden”, “evil is always punished” etc. Some well-known crime and mystery theme.

Example #4

Revenge is another recurrent theme found in many popular literary works. A character comes across certain circumstances that make him aware of his need for revenge. The outcome of his action is often bitter but sometimes they may end up being satisfied.

http://literarydevices.net/theme/

This us probably the last one before i log out, but these are only for my first standard, so i guess its good enough ya feel?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s